Europe

New teams are stepping up and the World Cup is proof of it

It’s been just over a month since the Vitality Hockey Women’s World Cup in London ended but the hype is still out around, people are still talking about it. Many stories have been heard and new history have been made on the hockey books. Every four years, we put our

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Pan American

World Cup: Australia vs. Argentina

Australia 0 vs. 0 Argentina 1.7.2018 Match 29/Quarter Final 8.15 Push Back It’s the second quarter final of the day and the competition. The Argentine fans are back, with the same group in the West stand challenging the same group in the East stand as to who can be noisiest.

World Cup: India vs. USA

Oceania

World Cup: Australia vs. Spain

Australia vs. Spain 5.8.2018 Match 35/Bronze Medal Match 2.00 Push Back Both teams are looking to pick themselves up today, after their losses on penalty shuffles in their respective Semi-Finals yesterday. Some say that, it is more enjoyable winning a bronze medal then getting the silver due to having won

Africa

World Cup: Argentina vs. South Africa

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The Hockey Reviews

Review: Kipsta FH900

Leading on from our general article on Decathlon Hockey, Decathlon promote themselves as being the market leader for sports retail across the globe (read the article here). We managed to get our hands on some of the products on offer by Decathlon’s Hockey Range, called Kipsta. In this first review,

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Hockey Terminology

TermTerm Description
16 or 16 Yard hit:A free hit by the defence: A restart of play when the ball travels over the back-line after last being played by an attacker and is taken from a point up to 14.63 metres (16 yards) from, and in line with, where it crossed the back-line. Procedures for taking a free-hit apply.
25 or 25 yard Line, 23 Meter Area:The common name for the area enclosed by and including the line across the field 22.90 metres (25 yards) from each back-line. Also known as the 23 metre area.
3-D Skills:Skills of the game performed above the playing surface i.e. in the air, such as the jink or air drag.
Abdominal Guard/Protector:A piece of protective equipment worn by a goalkeeper over the groin and abdominal region. Also know as a groin or pelvic guard/protector.
Add-Ten:A delay-of-game foul called by the Umpire. The result of the call is the Umpire giving the fouled team a free hit with the ball placed ten yards closer to the goal it is attacking.
Add-Ten (Up 10):A delay-of-game foul called by the Umpire. The result of the call is the Umpire giving the fouled team a free hit with the ball placed ten yards closer to the goal it is attacking.
Advantage:A call made by the umpire to continue a game after a foul has been committed if the fouled team gains an advantage.
Aerial:A pass across the field where the ball is lifted into the air over the players’ heads with a scooping or flicking motion.
Arm Band:A distinctive and distinguishing article worn on the arm of one player from each team to identify their role as captain.
Artificial Ground/Turf:A synthetic material (constructed of man-made materials) used for the field of play in place of grass. Surfaces can be sand-based, water-based or a hybrid combination, and are also known as synthetic or carpet ground/turf.
Assist  The pass or last two passes made that lead to the scoring of a goal.
Association:A regional or state/territory body that governs hockey in a particular region or state/territory. Regional associations affiliate with either the state/territory association who in turn affiliate with Hockey Australia.
Attack:The team that is trying to score a goal.
Attacker:A player who is trying to score a goal.
Attacker(s):1. The player/team in possession of the ball and trying to score a goal. 2. The group of players that are usually positioned at the offensive end of the field for their team. Also known as (Centre) forwards or strikers.
Attacking:The actions of a team/player in possession of the ball.
Australian Hockey League (AHL):Australia's premier hockey competition which is played annually and showcases the best players from across Australia as they compete in state/territory teams for the AHL title.
Back Marking:A method of marking whereby a defender covers, tracks and/or closely follows an opponent from behind in an attempt to prevent him/her from receiving the ball.
Back Pass  A pass that moves toward the passing team’s end of the field; it’s used to help keep possession of the ball and slow down the pace of the game.
Back Pass:A pass that moves toward the passing team’s end of the field; it’s used to help keep possession of the ball and slow down the pace of the game.
Back Post:The far post of the goal from the direction the shot is taken.
Back StickA foul called for hitting the ball with the rounded face of the hockey stick.
Back Swing:The movement of a players stick away from the ball in preparation to strike the ball.
Back-Board: A solid piece of material, often wooden, positioned directly behind the goal at right angles to side boards and parallel to the back-line. It is 460mm high and must be of dark colour on the inside.
Backhand:The use of the stick on the non-preferred (left) side to perform any skill e.g. a dribble, hit, tackle etc. Also known as the reverse or reverse stick.
Back-Line:The shorter (55 Meter) perimeter line. Back marking: A method of marking whereby a defender covers, tracks and/or closely follows an opponent from behind in an attempt to prevent him/her from receiving the ball.
Back-Stick/Back of the Stick:1. The rounded side of the hockey stick which is not permitted to be used during a match. 2. A phrase used to describe the offence of using the rounded side of the stick during a match.
Ball Carrier:The player in possession of the ball.
Ball Machine:A training aid used to project balls, usually at goalkeepers
Ball Protection:An offence whereby a player prevents an opponent who is attempting to play the ball by shielding the ball from a legitimate tackle normally using their stick.
Ball SideSee “Goal Side”
Ball:This must be spherical and can be made of any material (usually plastic) with a hard smooth or dimpled surface but indentations are permitted. It weighs between 156–163 grams (5½–5¾ ounces) with a circumference of 224–235 millimetres (8 13/16–9¼ inches). Usually white in colour, although other colours may be used as agreed.
Basic GripA style of holding the stick, the right hand is placed near the bottom of the grip and the left hand is placed at the top of the grip.
Bench:1. A seat where substitute players can sit often in the dugout. 2. A term used to describe substitute players.
BladeThe flat side of the stick’s head that is used for hitting the ball.
Blind Pass:Passing the ball without first looking to see if there is a teammate prepared to accept possession.
Block:The common term for a player (usually a goalkeeper) preventing a shot at goal from crossing the goal-line. Also known as a save.
Boards:The boards (usually wooden), comprising the longer (36–44 metres) perimeter of an indoor hockey pitch.
Bow:Any curvature along the length of the stick which can not be more than 25mm when the stick is laid on a flat surface. Also known as the rake of the stick.
Box:A piece of protective equipment, worn to protect the groin, often used by defenders during penalty corners. Also known as a cup.
BreakawayWhen an offender beats the last defender and goes one-on-one against the goalie.
Bully:A re-start to a match when time or play has been stopped for an injury or for any other reason and no penalty has been awarded. The ball is placed on the ground between one player from each team who face each other with the goal they are defending to their right. The two players start with their sticks on the ground to the right of the ball and then tap the flat faces of their sticks together once just over the ball after which either player is permitted to play the ball.
Bunt:The action of changing the direction of a ball with the stick, with a short arm pushing movement.
Burras:The Australian Men’s Under 21 Hockey Team.
Cage:The metal grill fixed to the front of a goalkeepers helmet.
Captain:One player from each team who is responsible for the behaviour of all players on their team and for ensuring that substitutions of players are carried out correctly.
Carpet:The playing surface of hockey playing fields that are constructed of man-made products. Surfaces can be sand-based, water-based or a hybrid combination, and are also known as artificial or synthetic grounds/turf.
Carry the Ball:See "Dribble".
Caution:A personal penalty issued by the umpire to an offending player in the form of verbal warning.
Centre Forward An offensive position that covers the middle of the offensive area and takes shots on goal; often referred to as the “striker.”
Centre Halfback A position that requires the player to cover the most ground of any player on the field. The centre halfback plays defence, offensive, and midfield while distributing the ball from side to side and front to back.
Centre Line A line that divides the field in half. The field is 100 yards (91.4 meters) long, so this is the 50-yard (45.7 meter) line.
Centre Mark The spot at the centre of the field on which the ball is placed to start play at the beginning of the first half, the second half, or following a goal.
Centre Forward:The playing position in the central area of the forward line, often with a wing forward on either side.
Centre Pass: A pass from the centre line of the field used to start the match or re-start the match after half-time and also after a goal has been scored. The procedures for taking a free hit apply. Used to be known as pass-back or a push-back when players were only allowed to pass back into their own half until rules were changed to allow the ball to go forward into the oppositions half.
Centre Line:The line across the pitch which divides it in half.
Champions Challenge:An FIH tournament which is held between six countries including the country who finished last (6th place) at the previous Champions Trophy and other countries that have not qualified for the Champions Trophy. The winner of the Champions Challenge gains a place in the next Champions Trophy.
Champions Trophy:An annual FIH tournament consisting of six countries made up of the winners of the previous Olympics Games, World Cup and Champions Trophy, the host country (which changes each year) and on even years the winner of the Champions Challenge. The other countries qualify in order of those finishing second and in subsequent places at the last Olympic Games or World Cup, whichever was more recent.
Channel/Channelling:An action(s) by one or more defenders to use their body position and movement to apply pressure to the ball carrier forcing them into a less advantageous field position i.e. towards the side line or back line and/or towards a team mate.
Charging:A play used to draw a foul, it involves running into an opposing player with the intention of playing the ball. If the opposing player blocks the charge with her body, they can be called for obstruction.
Chest Guard/Protector:A piece of protective equipment worn by a goalkeeper over the front of the upper body and can include attached shoulder and arm protection.
Circle Penetration:When the ball, in possession of attacking team, enters the attacking circle.
Circle :Otherwise known as the "shooting circle," the semi-circle mark in front of the goals.
Circle/The D:The area enclosed by and including the two quarter circles and the lines joining them at each end of the field opposite the centre of the back-lines.
Circle:A D-shaped arc marked inside the field by a solid line around the goals and opposite the centres of the back-line. An attacker must play the ball inside the circle for a goal to be scored. Also known as ‘the D’, goal circle, shooting circle or striking circle.
Clear:A defensive tactic used to dribble or hit the ball out of the 25-yard area.
Closed Dribble:The movement of a player while controlling the ball closely with the head of the stick.
Closing Down:A play that defensive players use to force the attacker into a position where the defender can take the ball.
Club:A body which is formed usually to play hockey in an organised competition. Generally clubs will affiliate with associations.
Coin Toss:A ritual that begins a game and results in one team beginning the game with possession of the ball. A coin is flipped by the Umpire, and the team that guesses the correct side of the coin gets to either start the game with possession of the ball or choose which side of the field it will defend.
Commonwealth Games:The Commonwealth Games are held every four years between each Olympic Games. Automatic qualifiers for the hockey tournament are the host nation, the defending champion and the winner of each of the six Commonwealth Games regions. Eligibility for any remaining places can vary at each Commonwealth Games, as dictated by the Commonwealth Games Federation
Composite/Composite Stick:A stick made in part, or wholly, from synthetic materials.
Corner Flag:A marker used to indicate the boundaries of the field. There is a flag in each corner of the field.
Corner Hit:See "Long corner".
Corner Hit/Long Corner:A re-start to play after the ball is played, unintentionally by a defender or deflected by a goalkeeper, over the back-line and no goal is scored. It is taken from a mark five metres from the corner of the field on the side-line nearest to where the ball crossed the back-line. Procedures for taking a free hit apply. Also known as a long corner.
Cover:A tactic used by defenders to protect their goal by staying within a close distance of an opposing attacker. Also see "Mark" and “Guard".
Cross:A pass that travels from the right side of the field to the left, or vice-versa.
Cross-Bar:Horizontal section of the goal which joins the two goal-posts 2.14 metres above the back of the goal-line.
Cup:A piece of protective equipment, worn to protect the groin, often used by defenders during penalty corners. Also known as a box.
Cut Off:To stand between two opposing players who may be able to pass to each other.
D or the D:A D-shaped arc marked inside the field by a solid line around the goals and opposite the centres of the back-line. An attacker must play the ball inside the ‘D’ for a goal to be scored. Also known as the circle, goal circle, shooting circle or striking circle.
Dangerous Play:Any action that could result in danger or injury to a player. Dangerous play could include a raised ball, an illegal tackle or playing the ball while lying on the ground.
Defence:The team which is trying to prevent a goal being scored.
Defender(s):1. The player/team not in possession of the ball and trying to prevent a goal being scored by the attacking team and/or gain possession of the ball. 2. The group of players positioned at the defensive end of the field for their team and are also known as backs.
Defender/Full Back:The player who is trying to prevent a goal being scored.
Defending:The actions of a team/player not in possession of the ball.
Defence (Defender):The team (player) which (who) is trying to prevent a goal from being scored.
Defensive Line :The field players positioned closest to the defending goal in the formation. These players are often known “ defenders.”
Deflection :A term used to describe a ball that has been redirected from its original path after a player’s stick has touched it.
Dispossession:When the defending team takes possession of the ball from the attacking team.
Dive :The term used to describe when a player or goalie lunges forward to stop or propel the ball forward.
Dodge :A term used to describe the action of getting past an opponent by maneuvering the ball around her.
Double V Grip:A style of holding the stick, both hands are placed at the top of the stick; the right hand is placed slightly below and on top of the left hand.
Drag:Movement of the ball by the ball carrier usually across the body keeping the stick head in contact with the ball.
Drag Flick:Usually a more powerful variation of a normal flick made distinct by the slinging motion of the flick. It is often used by players when attempting to score at a penalty corner.
Draw:The result of a match ending with the scores tied.
Dribble:The act of controlling the ball with short strokes of the stick while on the move. Also see “Carry the ball.”
Drill/Drilling:The action of propelling the ball into an opponent’s foot in an attempt to gain a free hit. This is often associated with indoor hockey.
Drive:A hard hit made by putting both hands together at the top of the stick and striking the ball.
Dugout:An area usually along the sideline of the field of play for each team to stand or sit during a game.
Dummy:An elimination skill where a body movement and a feint to pass are used to move a defender one way before dragging the ball the other way and dribbling past them on that other side. Also known as a feint.
Edge of the Stick:The two areas of the stick between the handle and the head where the flat (front) and the rounded (back) sections of the stick meet.
EHL:European Hockey League
Eliminate/Elimination:A term used to describe any manoeuvre used to get past an opponent or take the opponent out of the play. This is also known as a "dodge."
End Line:The painted line that designates each end of the playing area. Also known as the back line, the end line runs the width of the field. The portion of the end line between the posts of the goal is called the goal line.
Extra-Time:Two periods of play used to determine the winner of a match which is a draw at the conclusion of normal time.
Face Mask:A piece of protective equipment worn by a field player either during a match for medical reasons or more normally when defending a penalty corner or penalty stroke. If face masks are not being worn for medical reasons they must then be removed at the completion of the penalty corner or penalty strokes.
Feint:An elimination skill where a body movement and a feint to pass are used to move a defender one way before dragging the ball the other way and dribbling past them on that other side. Also known as a dummy.
Field and Equipment Specifications:The technical specifications required of the field of play, field equipment, and playing equipment under the Rules of Hockey.
Field Goal/FG:A goal scored from open, continuous play.
Field Player with Goalkeeping Privileges/Kicking Back:A field player or substitute who takes the place of the goalkeeper when the starting goalkeeper is unavailable or has been substituted. This player is allowed to use her feet to stop the ball while inside the defensive shooting circle. A kicking back must wear a distinguishing Shirt/Jersey. In the event of a defensive penalty corner or a stroke, the kicking back must wear a throat protector, chest protector, and helmet.
Field Player:One of the participants on a team other than the goalkeeper.
Field of Play/FOP/Field:The name for the playing area. The field is 100 yards (91.40 meters) long and 60 yards (55 meters) wide. It’s divided by a centre line and two 25-yard (23 meter) lines, one in each half of the field. Also see “Pitch.” Other characteristics include a centre-line, 23 metre lines, circles, penalty spots and goals.
FIH:The acronym for the French name of hockey’s world governing body, known in English as the International Hockey Federation.
Flagrant Foul:An intentionally rough or dangerous play, as deemed by the Umpire. A player who commits a flagrant foul is issued a red card and ejected from the game.
Flat Pass:A pass that travels straight to the right or left to a teammate.
Flat Slap :A hit similar to the drive; both hands are placed together when striking the ball, but the stick is held lower on the grip.
Flat Stick Trap:The action of a player gaining control of a moving ball with the stick angled horizontally, or close to, the playing surface.
Flick:1. Pushing the ball with the stick so that it is raised off the ground and often associated with the drag flick. 2. A term sometimes used to refer to a penalty stroke.
Flicker:The person who is known to take the drag-flick attempts at goal, usually from penalty corners.
Follow through:The movement of the stick after making contact with the ball, usually when the ball has been hit.
Foot:A foul that results from kicking the ball or using the feet to gain an unfair advantage. This does not have to be intentional.
Forehand:The position of the stick in accordance to a player’s body. The stick is held to the right of the body and the ball is played forward with the flat side of the stick facing forward. Also known as the Fore-Stick
Formation:The arrangement of players into their positions and roles on the field. Also known as a structure or system.
Forward:A player(s) trying to score a goal. These players are often positioned at the offensive end of the pitch for their team. Also known as an attacker or striker.
Foul:A penalty call given to a player who breaks one of the rules of the game.
Free Hit:A play awarded to a team when the opposition commits any infraction outside of the shooting circle. It takes place at or near the spot of the infraction, and all opposing players must stand at least five yards away from the player taking the hit.
Front Marking:A method of marking whereby a defender covers, tracks and/or closely follows an opponent from in front in an attempt to prevent him/her from receiving the ball.
Front Post:The post on the goal closest to the person taking the shot.
Full Back:A defender(s) usually positioned as one of the most defensive field players.
Game:Usually referred to a match of hockey
Gauntlets:The old name for the style of glove worn by goalkeepers, now referred to as gloves or hand protectors.
Give and Go:When a player passes the ball to a teammate who receives the pass and immediately sends the ball right back to the player who originally passed it. This is an offensive tactic used to get around an opposing player. Also see “Wall pass.”
Glove(s):1. Common name for goalkeepers hand protectors. 2. Protective equipment covering the hand(s) as worn by field players.
Goal Backboard:A piece of wood that is inside the bottom part of the goal. It is approximately 18 inches (45 centimeters) high.
Goal Line:The portion of the back line that is between the goal posts. The ball has to cross this line for a team to be awarded a goal.
Goal Side :A strategy in marking used to describe a player standing between the opponent and the goal.
Goal:1. Two vertical goal-posts joined by a horizontal cross-bar placed at the centre of each back-line. Both the goal-posts and cross-bar have a rectangular cross-section. The dimensions of a hockey goal are 3.66 metres wide by 2.14 metres high. Indoor hockey goals are three metres wide by two metres high. 2. The act of scoring. A goal is scored when the ball is played within the circle by an attacker and does not travel outside the circle before passing completely over the goal-line and under the cross-bar. Goals can be scored as a field goal, penalty corner, penalty stroke or penalty goal.
Goalkeeper/Goalie/Keeper:The one player on the field for each team who is allowed to use the kickers, leg guards, and a goalie stick to defend the goal. The goalie also wears pads on the hands, but she cannot use those pads to swat the ball down. The goalkeeper wears a helmet and facemask, along with abdomen, chest and leg protectors.
Goal-Line:The back-line between the goal posts.
Goal-Post:The vertical posts of the goal joined by a horizontal cross-bar.
Goal-Side/Ball Side: The position a defender assumes between his/her defensive goal and an opponent when marking them.
Golden Goal:A method of deciding the result of a drawn match whereby the team scoring first during a period of extra-time wins the match.
Green CardA card issued by the Umpire as a warning for a minor rules violation.
Green Card:A coloured card signifying the umpire is warning a player about a specific offence committed. Green cards are usually triangular shaped.
Grip:1. The way in which a player holds their stick. 2. The covering material used to cover the handle of the stick to aid players’ control of their stick.
Groin Guard/Protector:A piece of protective equipment worn by a goalkeeper over the groin and abdominal region. Also know an abdominal or pelvic guard/protector.
Ground:1. The playing surface. 2. A venue where hockey is played, i.e. a hockey facility or stadium.
Hack/Hacking:A colloquial term used to describe: 1. An instance of foul play usually associated with one player striking another players stick with theirs. 2. A player who ‘hacks’ as above, and/or is not considered to poses a high level of skill.
Half Back:A player positioned generally around the middle of the field for a team.
Half-Time:A break in play of five minutes between the first half and the second half.
Hand Protectors:Protective equipment worn by the goalkeeper.
Handle:The part of the stick identifiable from the head which extends from the top of the stick to 100mm from the base of the head.
Hat Trick:When a player scores three goals in one game.
Head of the Stick:The section of the stick distinct from the handle by being of an open ‘J’ or ‘U’ shape. It must also be flat on the left-hand side only.
Helmet:An item of protective headgear, including fixed full-face protection worn by the goalkeeper.
High Ball:A foul called for lifting the ball above the knee and within five meters of another player.
High StickA foul called for raising the stick above shoulder level.
Hit:A strike of the ball using a downward swinging movement of the stick. This stroke is used to make long passes or to take shots on goals.
Hit-in:A restart of play by a player from the team not last to touch the ball before it went out of play and taken from the point on the side-line where the ball crossed when leaving the field. Procedures for taking a free hit apply.
Hockey Census:Hockey Australia’s National Hockey Census is an annual survey of associations, clubs and schools to determine the number of hockey players, participants, teams and clubs in Australia.
HockeyEd:Hockey Australia’s National Officiating and Coaching Accreditation Scheme.
HockeyNet:Hockey Australia’s national database and results system.
Hockeyroos:The Australian Women’s Hockey Team.
Hocquet:A medieval game popular in France meaning ‘shepherds crook’ that the English word hockey is thought to come from.
Hook (of the stick):A term used to describe the area inside the curved head of a hockey stick.
Hook in2 Hockey:Hockey Australia’s national junior recruitment program designed to increase the number of junior hockey participants and club members.
Hooking:A foul called when a player uses the stick to hook an opponent’s stick or leg.
Hybrid Surface:The newest type of synthetic playing surface which is filled and/or dressed with sand. These types of surface are generally filled and/or dressed with less sand than a sand based surface and play more like a water based surface without requiring to be watered.
Indian Dribble:A term given to the motion a player uses to repeatedly move the ball across the body whilst running. This technique was first used by the Indian teams of the 1950’s.
Indoor Hockey:A distinct game to field hockey, its differences are characterised by play between two teams of six players on each team using a smaller pitch and goals, as well as being shorter in duration, and using boards along both side-lines to allow the ball to stay in play. The rules mean the ball can only be pushed and not hit, as well the ball not being allowed to be raised from the playing surface, except for shots on goal.
Inject/Injection:The action of getting the ball in to play at a penalty corner from a mark on the back-line approximately ten metres from either goal-post. Also known as a pushing.
Injector:The player that does the push in on a penalty corner.
Inner:A forward or midfield position that has the player(s) positioned at or near the centre of the field when there are more than three players on one line.
Inside Forward/Inner:The playing positions, usually one on the left and on the right side of the field, located between the half backs and the high, or strike, forwards.
Intercept/Interception:The action of the defending team gaining possession of the ball by cutting off a pass from an attacker.
Interchange:A temporary switch of positions by teammates during play.
Jab/Jab Tackle:Usually refers to a type of tackle made by a lunging motion at the ball with one hand on the stick. Also know as a poke or stab tackle.
Jillaroos:The Australian Women’s Under 21 Hockey Team.
Jink:The action of the ball carrier whilst dribbling to raise the ball over the attempted tackle of an opponent.
Junior World Cup:An international tournament for players under the age of 21 as at 1 st January in the year of competition. It is played in the year between the Olympic Games and the World Cup and is contested by 16 teams.
Keeper:Abbreviation for goalkeeper.
Kevlar:A composite material sometimes used to make field hockey sticks.
Kicker(s):A piece of protective equipment worn by a goalkeeper and fastened over the front and sides of the shoe to allow them to kick the ball.
Kicking Back:See “Field Player with Goalkeeping Privileges”
Kookaburras:Name given to the Australian Men’s Hockey Team.
Las LeonasName given to the Argentinian Women’s Hockey Team
Lead/Leading:The movement of an attacking player who is not in possession of the ball to create an opportunity to receive a pass from the ball carrier, create space for the ball carrier to move into and/or create confusion amongst defenders.
Leading Pass:A type of pass where one player sends the ball a few yards ahead of a teammate to signal the player to run toward the open area.
Leg guard(s):Protective equipment worn by the goalkeeper covering the lower legs usually also with kickers.
Line-Up:Also known as "formation," the setup and positioning of players on one team.
Link:See “Midfielder” and “Halfback.”
Long Corner:A colloquial term used to describe the re-start to play after the ball is played, unintentionally by a defender or deflected by a goalkeeper, over the back-line and no goal is scored. It is taken from a mark five metres from the corner of the field on the side-line nearest to where the ball crossed the back-line. Procedures for taking a free hit apply. Also known as a corner hit.
Posting UpThis is an action by a team member that approaches the ball when it is passed to them.
Long Grip:A way to grip the stick where the hands are positioned together at the top of the handle of the stick. This grip is usually used to hit the ball.
Split GripA way to grip the stick with the left hand at the top of the stick and the right hand half way down the stick usually at the end of the grip
Long Hit:See "long corner".
Long :Short way of saying "long corner," a free hit for the offense on the sideline five yards from the end line.
Man-on:Describing the warning to a teammate with the ball that a player from the opposing team is coming to defend them.
Man-to-Man Marking:A defensive strategy where each defensive player chooses a player from the opposing team to mark.
Mark/Marking:The movement of a defender to cover, track and/or follow an opponent in an attempt to prevent him/her from receiving the ball. Techniques include one-on-one marking, zone marking, front marking, back marking and side marking.
Mask:A piece of protective equipment worn by a field player over their face either during a match for medical reasons or more normally when defending a penalty corner or penalty stroke. If masks are not being worn for medical reasons they must then be removed at the completion of the penalty corner or penalty strokes. Also known as a face mask.
Match:A game of hockey.
Midfield Line :The field players positioned between the offensive and defensive lines in the middle of the formation. These players are often known “midfielders.”
Midfielder :A position that covers the middle of the field. Players at this position have both offensive and defensive responsibilities. Their job is to get the ball from their team’s defense and move it up the field to the offense.
Mini Hockey:Modified versions of traditional hockey adapted for junior players and often played by teams of less than 11 and on a smaller sized playing area than a standard hockey field. Also known as Minkey.
Minkey:The name given to some mini hockey. The concept originated in Australia and is now utilised in many other countries.
Mis-Trap:An attempt by a player to trap or stop the ball that results in them losing control and/or possession of the ball.
Modified hockey:Versions of hockey which are different to ‘traditional’ 11-a-side hockey. These are often played with a reduced number of players and/or on a smaller playing area than a standard hockey field. These could include mini hockey, quarter or half field hockey, seven or nine-a-side hockey, Rookey and Hook in2 Hockey.
Mouth Guard:A piece of protective equipment, usually worn by field players and normally around their upper set of teeth and gums.
National Championships:All Hockey Australia Championships, other than the AHL, where state/territory association teams compete against each other for the title of National Champion. This includes, the Australian Under 15, Under 18, Under 21 Championships, the Under 18 Indoor, Under 21 Indoor and Senior Indoor Men's and Women's Championships, as well as the Country and Women's Veterans Championships.
Net:Mesh attachment secured outside the goal-posts and cross-bar to prevent the ball passing between them or the side-boards or back-board.
NTC:Abbreviation for National Training Centre.
Obstruction:An offence whereby a player prevents an opponent who is attempting to play the ball by i.e. backing into an opponent, physically interfering with the stick or body of an opponent or shielding the ball from a legitimate tackle with their stick or any part of their body. Also known as shepherding or shielding.
Offence:An action contrary to the Rules which may be penalized by an umpire.
Offensive Line :The field players positioned closest to the opposing team’s goal in the formation. These players are often known as “forwards.”
Officials Table :A table located on the side-line in the middle of the field (at the centre line) where umpires check players’ equipment, monitor players’ conduct on the bench, allow substitutions, and fill out the official score sheet.
Olympic Games:The Olympic Games is regarded as the most prestigious event in world hockey with both the men’s and the women’s competitions comprised of 12 teams each. Automatic qualifiers are the winners of each continental championship, with the remaining places determined through qualification tournaments.
One Hand/One Handed:Playing the ball with only one hand holding the stick.
One-Handed Grip :A style of holding the stick, only one hand is used to hold the stick at the top of the grip.
One-To-One Marking:See “Man to Man Marking”
Open Dribble:The movement of a player while controlling the ball with the stick by playing it in front of him/her.
Open Grip:A way to grip the stick where the hands are positioned apart from each other with the left hand at the top of the handle and the right hand at the bottom of the handle. This grip is often used to trap the ball and to push pass the ball.
Open Player:Any player who is unmarked by a defender.
Over-GripStick grip that is placed on top of worn or old grip to improve a player’s hold on the stick.
Over-Head:A type of pass where the ball is lofted over the heads of other players. Also known as an aerial or scoop.
Overruns:The area surrounding the backlines and sidelines of a hockey pitch. Also known as the run off area.
Overtime/Extra-time :A specific amount of time or a set stanza that is added to the end of the regulation for the purpose of breaking a tie. Two versions of overtime are used: Standard overtime, where teams play for the most goals scored within the period; and sudden-death overtime, where the first team to score is declared the winner.
Pads:A term used to describe either, specifically the leg guards of a goalkeeper, or more generally, all of the protective equipment worn by a goalkeeper.
Participant:A hockey player who is involved in more than one structured hockey competition and/or program.
Pass Back :The play that begins the game and the second half, and restarts action after a goal is scored. During a pass back, all players must be on their team’s side of the field and all opposing players must be at least five yards away from the ball. One of the offensive players will pass the ball to a teammate who must be at least one yard behind the player passing the ball. Also see “Center pass.”                     
Pass:The term used to describe the action where one player gives possession of the ball to another. Common forms of passing include pushes, slaps, hits, aerials, and deflections.
Passing Lane:The open space between two players used to pass the ball back and forth.
Pelvic Guard/Protector:A piece of protective equipment worn by a goalkeeper over the groin and abdominal region. Also know as groin or abdominal guard/protector.
Penalty Corner/PC:A penalty awarded to the attacking team for offences inside the defensive teams 23 metre area. This penalty is then taken by placing the ball on the back-line at least ten metres from either goal post. One attacking player pushes or hits the ball to a team-mate just outside the circle. All attackers must be outside the circle before the push/hit is taken. A maximum of five defenders (including the goalkeeper) may be behind the goal-line while the remaining defenders must be positioned beyond the centre line. No shot at goal is permitted until the ball has travelled outside the circle. If the first shot at goal is a hit (as opposed to a push, flick or scoop) the ball must cross the goal-line at a height of not more than 460mm i.e. the height of the back-board.
Penalty Spot:A circular field marking in front of the centre of each goal, 6.40 metres from the inner edge of the goal-line, and where penalty strokes are taken from. In indoor hockey this spot is 7 metres from the goal-line.
Penalty Stroke Competition:A method of deciding the winner of a match which is drawn, usually after the completion of extra-time. Five players from each of the two teams alternately take a penalty stroke each against the defending goalkeeper. The team who scores the most penalty strokes from their five attempts wins the game. If after five attempts each both teams have scored the same number of penalty strokes, a second series of penalty strokes is taken, with the winner being the team who scores one more goal than the other after the same number of penalty strokes.
Penalty StrokeA penalty shot on goal where an offender is awarded one shot against only the goalie. The ball is placed seven yards (6.4 meters) from the goal and only the goalkeeper is allowed to defend. The call is mainly awarded when a defender fouls an opponent in the shooting circle.
Penalty/Penalties:These are awarded for by an umpire for actions deemed to be offences and therefore contrary to the Rules and are comprised of playing penalties and personal penalties.
P-Flick :Slang term for "penalty spot" or "stroke mark,"a spot marked seven yards from the goal where penalty shots or strokes are taken.
Pile Length/Depth:The height of the upright strands of artificial carpet used as the playing surface on synthetic grounds.
Pitch and Equipment Specifications: The technical specifications required of the pitch, pitch equipment, and playing equipment under the Rules of Indoor Hockey.
Pitch Marking(s):The lines and other marks on the playing surface as per the Field and Equipment Specifications of the Rules of Hockey.
Pitch :See “Field of Play.”
Play On:A call used by the umpire to instruct players that an advantage situation is being played.
Player:An individual who takes part in a structured hockey competition and/or program.
Playing Distance:The distance within which a player is capable of reaching the ball to play it.
Playing Penalty/Penalties:Penalties awarded by an umpire to a team that has been disadvantaged by an offence by the other team that include a free hit, a 10 metre advancement of a free hit, a penalty corner and a penalty stroke.
Playing Surface:The type of material, whether natural or synthetic, that a hockey field is made from.
Playing the Ball:Stopping, deflecting or moving the ball with the stick. Players, excluding the goalie, are only allowed to play the ball with the flat side (usually the left side) of the stick.
Poke/Poke Tackle:Usually refers to a type of tackle made by a lunging motion at the ball with one hand on the stick. Also know as a jab or stab tackle.
Possession:When one team has control of the ball and are therefore known as the attacking team.
Pull :A type of dodge used to maneuver the ball around an opponent. In this dodge, the ball is dragged (pulled ) from the left to the right, right to left, or backwards.
Pull/Pull Drag:A type of drag that involves a short pulling movement of the ball across the front of the body and close to the feet using the hook of the stick.
Push Back :To move back as a team from the offensive side of the field to the defensive side.
Push In:When one team knocks the ball out of bounds and the other team hits the ball back in play quickly from the sideline in an effort to take the other team by surprise.
Push Out:A pass made by the ejector on a penalty corner to the offense on top of the shooting circle.
Push Up:To move as a team from the defensive side of the field to the offensive side.
Push/Push Pass:Moving the ball along the ground using a pushing movement of the stick after the stick has been placed close to the ball. When a push is made, both the ball and the head of the stick are in contact with the ground.
Pusher:The person who pushes, or injects, the ball into play from a penalty corner.
Push-In:The action of getting the ball in to play at a penalty corner from a mark on the back-line approximately ten metres from either goal-post. Also known as the injection or injecting.
Raised BallA foul called by the Umpire for lifting the ball more than 18 inches off the ground. Also see “High ball.”
Raised Hit:A hit that is raised from the playing surface, often dangerously.
Rake:Any curvature along the length of the stick which cannot be more than 25mm when the stick is laid on a flat surface. Also known as the bow of the stick.
Rebound :A term used to describe a ball that bounces back into play off the goalie’s pads.
Receive/Receiving:The action of a player taking control of the ball with their stick.
Red Card:A coloured card shown by the umpire permanently suspending an offending player from a match. Red cards are usually round in shape.
Referee :See “Umpire”
Regional Association:A body that governs hockey in a particular region or area of a state/territory association and that usually has clubs affiliated to it.
Replacement Grip :Stick grip used to replace worn grip. The original grip is completely removed and the replacement grip is applied in its place.
Restart:The resumption of play after either, a goal has been scored, or time has been stopped by an umpire.
Reverse Drive :A hit where the ball is struck with the inside edge of the stick using a backward swinging motion.
Reverse Hit :A hit made by turning the stick 180 degrees over the ball to hit it from left to right with the flat side of the stick.
Reverse Spin :A move where the player turns to the right in a circle with the ball on the reverse stick. This move is used to dodge an opposing player and open up space for a pass to a teammate.
Reverse Stick Push:A type of hit where the stick is turned or reversed over the ball in a light swinging motion from left to right.
Reverse/Reverse Stick:The use of the stick on the non-preferred (left) side to perform any skill e.g. a dribble, hit, tackle etc. Also known as the backhand or backhand side.
Roof/Roofed/roofing:A colloquial term for the underside of the netting extending backwards from the cross bar of the goal.
Rookey:Hockey Australia’s national participation program which is played using a modified stick and ball and focuses on maximum player involvement using small-sided games. Rookey aims to increase participation in hockey particularly amongst primary school aged children.
Roster :An official list of players, the players’ positions, and the players’ numbers that each team submits to the officiating crew prior to the game.
Rules:The Rules of Hockey as issued by the Hockey Rules Board under the authority of the International Hockey Federation (FIH).
Run off Area:The area surrounding the backlines and sidelines of a hockey pitch. Also known as the overruns.
Runner:The name given to the defender(s) who run from the goal-line during a penalty corner in an attempt to prevent the attacking team from scoring.
Rusher :A defensive player chosen to sprint toward an opposing player taking a shot at the top of the shooting circle during a penalty corner.
Sand-Based Surface:A synthetic playing surface which is filled and/or dressed with sand.
Save:The common term for a player (usually a goalkeeper) preventing a shot at goal from crossing the goal-line. Also known as a block or deflection.
Scoop:Raising the ball off the ground by placing the head of the stick under the ball and using a lifting movement.
Send the Ball :A command made by a player telling a teammate to hit the ball from the defensive side of the field to the offensive side.
Shield :To stand in front of the opposing goalie or field player to decrease their visibly and ability to get to the ball.
Shielding/Shepherd/shepherding:Another term for a third party obstruction offence whereby a player attempts to prevent an opponent from to playing the ball.
Shin Guards/Shin Pads:Pads used to protect a player’s shins.
Shin Guards/Shin Pads:Protective equipment worn over the lower leg by field players.
Shooting Circle :An area in the shape of a capital “D” and made up of two quarter-circles. It measures 16 yards out from each goal post and is joined by a short straight line. An attacking player must be within this area to score. Also known as the “D.”
Short Corner :See “Penalty corner.”
Short Grip:A way to grip the stick where the hands are positioned together midway along the handle of the stick. This grip is often used to hit or slap hit the ball.
Short/Short Corner:A play awarded to the offensive team for a foul committed inside the shooting circle or the 23 meter area, by the defensive team.
Short-Handle Grip:A style of holding the stick, both hands are placed midway down the grip.
Shot/Shot at Goal:The action of an attacker attempting to score by playing the ball towards the goal from within the circle.
Shuttles :A warm-up routine that has a team split into two lines (facing each other) and practice passing the ball back and forth.
Side In :A pass that puts the ball back into play after it has gone out of bounds. Also see “Push in.”
Side Marking:A method of marking whereby a defender covers, tracks and/or closely follows an opponent from one side in an attempt to prevent him/her from receiving the ball.
Side-Boards:The boards (usually wooden) comprised of the longer (36–44 metres) perimeter of an indoor hockey pitch.
Side-Line:The boundary marker that runs the length (100 yards/91.4 meters) of the field. Free hits are taken from the sideline after the ball is hit out of bounds.
Signal(s):Movements made by the umpires with their hands and arms to indicate a decision.
Sin-bin:A nominal area temporarily suspended players must stay whilst suspended from the field of play.
Slap/Slap-Hit:Striking the ball using a sweeping movement of the stick towards the ball, often with the stick head in contact with the ground during the back swing and the follow through. Also referred to as a sweep hit.
Slip Drag:The action of a player receiving the ball while turning, often while trying to evade an opponent.
Smock:A shirt worn by a goalkeeper of a different colour to their team mates and that of the opposition and usually over a chest and arm guards/protection.
Spin :A move where a player turns to the left in a circle with the ball on the stick; it is used to dodge an opposing player and open up space for a pass to a teammate.
Split the Defence :A tactic used to confuse the opponent’s defence by passing the ball between its players.
Square PassA pass across the field made in order to change a team’s overall point of attack.
Squeeze:A type of hit whereby a player strikes the top of the ball thereby forcing it into the ground with the intention to raise the hit.
Stab/stab tackle:Usually refers to a type of tackle made by a lunging motion at the ball with one hand on the stick. Also know as a poke or jab tackle.
Steal:An action whereby a defending player takes possession of the ball from an attacker who is in control of the ball.
Stick Interference :A foul called for using the stick to hit an opponent's stick, whether intentionally or unintentionally. Also see “Hacking.”
Stick:A hockey stick must have certain characteristics to be considered legal within the Rules of Hockey: 1. Traditional shape, 2. Two identifiable parts i.e. a handle and a head, 3. Smooth, with no rough or sharp parts, 4. Head ‘J’ or ‘U’ shaped, 5. Head must be flat on the left (face) hand side, 6. Must be able to pass through a ring with an interior diameter of 51mm, 7. Curvature along the length i.e. the rake or bow is limited to a depth of 25mm, 8. Edges and back must be rounded and smooth, 9. Total weight a maximum of 737 grams, 10. No metal components.
Stop:The action of gaining control of a moving ball with the stick. Also known as a trap.
Stopper :An offensive player who stops the ball on a penalty corner in order for another attacker to take a shot.
Stops:The name given to sprigs, studs or cleats found on some hockey footwear.
Striker/Strike Forward:The player(s) usually positioned at the offensive end of the pitch for their team. This usually refers to the centre forward and wingers. Also known as an attacker or forward.
Striking Circle:The area enclosed by and including the two quarter circles and the lines joining them at each end of the field opposite the centre of the back-lines. Also see “ D or The D”
Stroke Mark :See “Penalty spot.”
Stroke :A penalty shot that is awarded when an attacking player is fouled on a scoring opportunity inside the shooting circle. The fouled team chooses one player from the team to take a shot on goal with no defenders standing between that player and the opposing goalie.
Structure:The arrangement of players into their positions and roles on the field. Also known as a system or formation.
Substitute:A player on a team not on the field of play that may replace another player during a match. There may be up to five substitutes per team and interchanges can be made an unlimited number of times during a game.
Swatting :A foul called against a goalie for making a swinging motion at the ball.
Sweep: Striking the ball using a sweeping movement of the stick towards the ball, often with the stick head in contact with the ground during the back swing and the follow through. Also referred to as a slap-hit.
Sweeper:A field player position whereby one player occupies a deep defensive role to provide cover defence for his/her team.
Swing:The motion of the stick towards the ball, usually a hit.
Switch the Field :A play that has a team send the ball from one side of the field to the other in a fluid motion.
Synthetic Ground/Turf:Hockey playing fields that are constructed of man-made products. Surfaces can be sand-based, water-based or a hybrid combination, and are also known as synthetic or carpet.
System:The arrangement of players into their positions and roles on the field. Also known as a structure or formation.
Tackle:An action to stop an opponent retaining possession of the ball.
Tagging:The movement of a defender to cover, track and/or follow an opponent in an attempt to prevent him/her from receiving the ball. Also known as marking.
Team Mate:A fellow member of a team.
Team:A team consists of 11 players on the field. See also “Squad”
Squad:A squad consists of a maximum of 16 players of which 11 players take part in a game at any one time which also includes the goalkeeper.
The “D” :Another name for the "shooting circle," the semi-circle mark in front of the goals.
The Rules:The Rules of Hockey as issued by the Hockey Rules Board under the authority of the International Hockey Federation (FIH).
Third Party/Third Man:An obstruction offence caused by a player who runs in front of or blocks an opponent to stop them legitimately playing or attempting to play the ball from an attacking player.
Through Pass:A pass that moves the ball forward to a teammate between defending players.
Time :Player lingo for a command to let a teammate know that they have time to dribble the ball.
Time Wasting:An offence committed by a player who is seeking to gain benefit by delaying play.
Time-off:When an umpire stops playing time during a match.
Time-on:When an umpire starts or re-starts playing time during a match.
Time-Wasting :A penalty called for any action or non-action that keeps play from continuing or resuming within a reasonable period of time.
Toe of the Stick:The base of the head of a hockey stick i.e. the area between the flat side and the rounded side of the head.
Tomahawk/Toma:The colloquial name given to a low reverse-stick shot at goal using the edge of the stick nearest the inside of the head of the stick.
Trailer :A defensive player on a penalty corner who follows the rusher in an attempt to block a direct shot on goal or cut off a pass by the offense.
Transfer/transfer of play:The movement of the ball by the attacking team from one side of the field to the other
Trap:The action of a player gaining control of a moving ball with the stick. Also known as a stop.
Trapper: The name given to the player who controls the ball outside the circle during their teams attacking penalty corners.
Trapping :A penalty for the stepping on the ball or covering it with the body.
Triangle :A defensive formation used by midfield players.
Triangle Passing :A passing strategy involving three players. The player with the ball remains between the two open players who form the remaining points of a triangle. Passes are made between these three players and the triangle is constantly moving around the ball.
Tripping :A penalty that has a player use the stick to trip an opposing player.
Turnover:When the attacking team loses possession of the ball to the defending team.
Two v One :A warm-up routine that has two offensive players attempt to pass past one defender. The number of people in the warm-up can vary.
Umpire:One of two officials responsible for enforcing the rules of the game on the pitch. Each umpire is responsible for half of the field, the field being split diagonally.
Undercut/Undercutting :The name given to the action of a player striking the ball and raising it from the playing surface, commonly when attempting to score a goal.
Un-sportsman like Conduct :A foul called for dangerous play, using obscene language, or taunting. Results in a green card (warning), yellow card (five-minute suspension), or red card (player disqualification). When players are suspended or disqualified, their team must play with fewer members than the opposition.
Upper V :Slang term used to describe the top corners of the goal.
Upright trap:The action of a player gaining control of a moving ball with the stick angled more vertically than horizontally in relation to the playing surface.
Wall Pass :See “Give-and-go.”
Water Down :To soak the artificial surface in water before a match. Wet turf holds the ball to the ground better than dry turf.
Water-Based Surface:A synthetic playing surface which is filled and/or dressed with water.
Whistle:A woodwind instrument used by umpires to officiate hockey matches.
Wing Forward/Winger:The playing positions of wide strikers/strike forwards, usually one on the left and one on the right side of the field, and either side of the centre forward.
Wing:The area of the playing field inside both side-lines and where the wing forward/winger plays.
Wood/Wooden Stick:The traditional material hockey sticks have been made from.
World Cup:The World Cup is the largest international hockey tournament in the world and the most prestigious and is held on a quadrennial basis between Olympic Games. The host nation, World Cup title holder and the winner of each continental championship are automatic qualifiers with the remaining places filled through qualifying tournaments.
World Hockey Player of the Year:Annual FIH awards given to the best male and best female player, as voted by the players from the world’s best hockey nations. The women’s award was won by Alyson Annan in 1998 & 2000, while the men’s award was won by Jay Stacy in 1999 and then Jamie Dwyer in 2004 and 2007.
World Hockey:An FIH brand for hockey.
YardsTerm sometimes used to remind defensive players about the distance they need to be from a free hit.
Yellow card:A coloured card signifying the umpire has temporarily suspended an offending player from a match for a minimum of five minutes. Yellow cards are usually rectangular shaped.
Zone/Zonal marking:A method of marking whereby a defender covers and occupies a specific area of the pitch and therefore marks opposition players that come into that area.